1. 
Marcus Mosiah Garvey,  (17 August 1887 – 10 June 1940)
Publisher, journalist, entrepreneur and orator who was a staunch proponent of the Black Nationalism and Pan-Africanism movements, to which end he founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA-ACL).  Garvey was unique in advancing a Pan-African philosophy to inspire a global mass movement and economic empowerment focusing on Africa known as Garveyism. Promoted by the UNIA as a movement of African Redemption, Garveyism would eventually inspire others, ranging from the Nation of Islam to the Rastafari movement. The intent of the movement was for those of African ancestry to “redeem” Africa and for the European colonial powers to leave it. His essential ideas about Africa were stated in an editorial in the Negro World titled “African Fundamentalism” where he wrote: “    Our union must know no clime, boundary, or nationality… let us hold together under all climes and in every country.”
References:
Garvey, M. (2005) Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey. Dover Thrift Editions ISBN-10: 0486437876Grant, C. (2009) Negro with a Hat: Marcus Garvey. Vintage ISBN-10: 0099501457
    
Marcus Mosiah Garvey,  (17 August 1887 – 10 June 1940)
Publisher, journalist, entrepreneur and orator who was a staunch proponent of the Black Nationalism and Pan-Africanism movements, to which end he founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA-ACL).  Garvey was unique in advancing a Pan-African philosophy to inspire a global mass movement and economic empowerment focusing on Africa known as Garveyism. Promoted by the UNIA as a movement of African Redemption, Garveyism would eventually inspire others, ranging from the Nation of Islam to the Rastafari movement. The intent of the movement was for those of African ancestry to “redeem” Africa and for the European colonial powers to leave it. His essential ideas about Africa were stated in an editorial in the Negro World titled “African Fundamentalism” where he wrote: “    Our union must know no clime, boundary, or nationality… let us hold together under all climes and in every country.”
References:
Garvey, M. (2005) Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey. Dover Thrift Editions ISBN-10: 0486437876Grant, C. (2009) Negro with a Hat: Marcus Garvey. Vintage ISBN-10: 0099501457
    
Marcus Mosiah Garvey,  (17 August 1887 – 10 June 1940)
Publisher, journalist, entrepreneur and orator who was a staunch proponent of the Black Nationalism and Pan-Africanism movements, to which end he founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA-ACL).  Garvey was unique in advancing a Pan-African philosophy to inspire a global mass movement and economic empowerment focusing on Africa known as Garveyism. Promoted by the UNIA as a movement of African Redemption, Garveyism would eventually inspire others, ranging from the Nation of Islam to the Rastafari movement. The intent of the movement was for those of African ancestry to “redeem” Africa and for the European colonial powers to leave it. His essential ideas about Africa were stated in an editorial in the Negro World titled “African Fundamentalism” where he wrote: “    Our union must know no clime, boundary, or nationality… let us hold together under all climes and in every country.”
References:
Garvey, M. (2005) Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey. Dover Thrift Editions ISBN-10: 0486437876Grant, C. (2009) Negro with a Hat: Marcus Garvey. Vintage ISBN-10: 0099501457

    Marcus Mosiah Garvey,  (17 August 1887 – 10 June 1940)

    Publisher, journalist, entrepreneur and orator who was a staunch proponent of the Black Nationalism and Pan-Africanism movements, to which end he founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA-ACL).  Garvey was unique in advancing a Pan-African philosophy to inspire a global mass movement and economic empowerment focusing on Africa known as Garveyism. Promoted by the UNIA as a movement of African Redemption, Garveyism would eventually inspire others, ranging from the Nation of Islam to the Rastafari movement. The intent of the movement was for those of African ancestry to “redeem” Africa and for the European colonial powers to leave it. His essential ideas about Africa were stated in an editorial in the Negro World titled “African Fundamentalism” where he wrote: “    Our union must know no clime, boundary, or nationality… let us hold together under all climes and in every country.”

    References:

    Garvey, M. (2005) Selected Writings and Speeches of Marcus Garvey. Dover Thrift Editions ISBN-10: 0486437876

    Grant, C. (2009) Negro with a Hat: Marcus Garvey. Vintage ISBN-10: 0099501457

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      I was lucky enough to visit his homeland in St. Ann Parish
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